Admit it: who wants an Android coffee table?

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Do you often find yourself confused by what manufacturers could be thinking when they push phablet size up past the six-inch mark? Are Samsung’s new Galaxy TabPRO and NotePRO 12.2 so ostentatiously large as to make them unpalatable? We may have to ask you to leave the room for a moment, because this next Android model we’re looking at could very well cause your head to explode, Scanners-style: later this year, you’ll be able to order a 46-inch Android-powered coffee table.

Ideum already sells its Platform 46 Coffee Table running Windows 8, but this week announced a forthcoming Android edition. The hardware is x86 PC-based, which means this could be a killer Android machine, outfitted with 16GB of RAM and 500GB storage. The display is a 1080p model, incorporating multi-touch tracking from 3M, and the pedestal it rests on is crafted from aluminum. Unfortunately, it might be stuck with an older version of Android (at least at first), with Ideum mentioning plans to ship with Android 4.1.

At some point following the release of an Android-only model, Iduem intends to make a dual-boot Android/Win8 edition available. We don’t yet have pricing info for the Android edition, but based on the current Win8 Platform 46 model, we’re likely looking at something slightly north of $10,000. There’s also a more affordable 32-inch coffee table model, but so far there hasn’t been mention of bringing Android to that version.

Source: Ideum
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!