Pebble updates users on efforts towards Android app store

Advertisement

One week ago Monday, Pebble launched the 2.0 overhaul of its iOS app, introducing the Pebble app store. Getting access to those 1000-some apps and watchfaces was great for Apple users, but what about Android smartwatch fans? At the time, Pebble explained that it was fine-tuning the Android release, and that it expected to have it ready to go “very, very soon.” We were hoping that meant “a matter of days” and we’d be seeing the app launch by the end of the week, but that hasn’t come to pass. Apparently cognizant of so many users waiting, today Pebble posted an update to its blog, and while it doesn’t give us a hard ETA, it attempts to explain just what’s taking so long.

Really, the story isn’t anything we haven’t heard before from cross-platform developers: Android apps require coders to anticipate app behavior on so many different OS revisions, and on so much different hardware, that tweaking and testing just takes a while. Heck, Pebble even gives a shout out to any Android devs who might be looking for work, interested in bulking-up its team.

As for specific aspects of the app that are taking a lot of time to get right, Pebble points to things like the Javascript environment needed for new Pebble apps and the desire for a smooth upgrade process for users with watches still running older firmware.

But even as it calls Android a “hugely important platform” and “critical to our ongoing success,” Pebble still doesn’t have any firm idea of when this Android release will be ready to go. Will it arrive before MWC? We’d sure like to hope so.

Source: Pebble

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!