What ever happened to the Nokia Treasure Tag?

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Remember the Nokia Treasure Tag? We’ll forgive you if it doesn’t ring a bell, as it’s been a long time since we’ve had the opportunity to talk about the accessory. It first popped up on our radar all the way back in late July, where it was revealed as a Bluetooth LE accessory that could apparently be used alongside your phone to help you track down objects; leave a Treasure Tag on your keychain, and you’d never lose it again. But then… nothing much happened. The Treasure Tag would pop up a few months later alongside the Lumia 1520 in a press render, even giving us a preview of some Treasure Tag software, but it failed to ever actually launch. Now a new find has us thinking about the product again, wondering if Nokia ever plans to follow through with a release.

An apparent Nokia Treasure Tag app has been discovered over at the Windows Phone Store, labeled for Nokia internal use only. It’s described as a beta release, and was last updated back at the end of November. While we’d be a little more interested to see current work on the app, even that find suggests that the Treasure Tag may still be in Nokia’s pipeline, as this becomes the most recent sign of work on the project.

Nokia’s got that big MWC event coming up in just a few weeks; could it finally be time for the Treasure Tag to make an appearance? Honestly, at this late stage, it’s a crapshoot – either we see the Treasure Tag confirmed, or we might want to start filing this one away in our vaporware drawer.

Source: Windows Phone Store
Via: WMPoweruser

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!