iOS 8 may place big focus on health and fitness, with iWatch’s help

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Apple’s been a company with eyes on health, fitness, and wearable gadgets for a while now – heck, there’s been that Nike+iPod tracker going back the better part of a decade, launching in 2006, and that relationship with Nike has only led to more advanced accessories, like the Fuelband. But as we look to the future, with Apple rumored to launch its own smartwatch, that interest in health-related tech may become a much larger focal point, and rumors claim that iOS 8 could reflect this in a big way.

Rather than messing with the platform’s look and feel, as iOS 7 did, iOS 8 may concentrate on sensor-based health and fitness tracking, all built around an app called Healthbook. With the assistance of the iWatch, Healthbook would monitor a slew of vital signs – beyond just counting your steps (though it would do that, too), it could record your blood pressure, heart rate, and even your hydration level.

While it’s still possible that Apple may spin iOS 8 in another direction, company execs did meet with the FDA last month, and that sure would fit with the moves it would want to make before introducing Healthbook; the FDA has been stepping-up its regulatory interest in mobile apps, specifically any of those that may be seen as diagnosing conditions or offering medical advice.

Maybe this could even help give Apple some ammunition against Google Glass and the rise of wearables on Android – while Android wearables are “creepy” and help you surreptitiously snap pictures, Apple wearables keep you healthy! That’s one marketing campaign just begging to be written.

Source: 9to5 Mac
Via: TechCrunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!