What the Lenovo Motorola purchase means for Project Ara

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We’re still reeling a little bit from this evening’s wholly unexpected news of Lenovo acquiring Motorola’s smartphone business from Google. Shortly after first hearing it as a rumor, confirmation swiftly arrived, and we’ve had some time since to reflect on just what all this means. One question that we noticed popping up quite a bit in your comments following this news has been what this sale might mean for Motorola’s Project Ara, that cool modular design that may just change how we look at smartphone hardware. In what sounds like good news, Ara will be sticking with Google, rather than transferring over to Lenovo.

Motorola, like so many other smartphone companies, isn’t just a monolithic entity. When we talk about Motorola in this context, what we really mean is Motorola Mobility – this is just like how Microsoft didn’t by all of Nokia, but just the company’s “devices and services” division. While Lenovo is getting Motorola Mobility, Google is holding on to the Motorola Advanced Technology Group, and THAT’S the branch behind Project Ara (along with other similarly cool, really outside-the-box projects).

Of course, this still has us wondering what impact the sale may have on Ara’s distant future chances of maturing into a commercial project, but as far as the next experimental steps go, this is going to be Google’s baby.

Source: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!