Victory for wearables? Google Glass traffic ticket dismissed

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With wearable tech making its influx upon mainstream society, you had better believe that we’re all going to have to get used to this brave new future. What that actually means, we still have to learn – will we find ourselves being more careful about what we say around people when their watches could be recording us, or they could be snapping pictures of us with their glasses? Google Glass is at the forefront of many of these questions, and an important one got answered today in a California court. Well… sort of.

Cecilia Abadie was ticketed last year for driving while wearing her Glass headset, for “driving with a monitor visible.” She contested the ticket and the case made it to court today. With Glass likely to hit commercial sales later this year, we’ve been curious to learn what precedent the ruling might create. What we got, though, doesn’t answer all our questions.

The good new for Abadie is that the ticket was dismissed, but we’re more concerned with the “why.” The key factor behind the dismissal was that her Glass was not in active use at the time of ticket – she was merely wearing it. As such, the cited violation didn’t really apply.

What remains to be seen is if someone will be able to achieve a similar outcome while admitting to having content present on Glass’s display. Could it be fought on the grounds that getting directions on a heads-up display isn’t functionally different from getting them via a screen on your dash? We’re sure we’ll be finding out sooner or later. Probably “sooner.”

Source: Phandroid

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!