Leak teases new direction for TouchWiz on Samsung phones

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All these new Samsung tablets (and no, we’re not done talking about them quite yet) may offer some top-shelf hardware, but even those sky-high specs are only part of the appeal; we’ve also got to consider the software. This time, Samsung’s trying out something a little different, implementing what it calls its Magazine UX – and as we noted when giving these models some hands-on coverage, that really is what it feels to use the interface – like a news browser app. But Magazine UX, as Samsung itself admits, is “specifically optimized for a large screen;” so what does that mean for smartphones? Today we get what may just be an early peek at how Samsung’s handset UI is maturing, with a new leak claiming to reveal the company’s progress.

It’s difficult to say how far along this leak might be, or if it’s even close to how things will ultimately arrive, but from what little we can make out here, we’re at least seeing some of the same inspiration behind Magazine UX – specifically, it’s looking like we could still be dealing with sliding panels of content, though here in a decidedly vertical orientation. And that Magazine app in the quick launch bar sure doesn’t seem like it’s a coincidence.

But is this how the Galaxy S 5 will appear? The way that rumors have been going, we could be just weeks away from finding out, but again – there’s no way of telling just how old these shots may be. The October date, if that’s any indication, might mean that this is a much earlier attempt than the interface we ultimately get.

Source: @evleaks (Google+)

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!