Audi unveils Mobile Audi Smart Display Android tablet

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We knew Audi would be making a big splash at this year’s CES, but just how? We already told you about its role in forming the Open Automotive Alliance, and last night the company took to the stage for its keynote address. It didn’t have any Android-powered car to show off, but now we get what might be the next best thing, with the introduction of a tablet designed for in-vehicle use, the Mobile Audi Smart Display.

So, what makes this better for car use than your run-of-the-mill tablet? Well, besides an interface that’s supposedly optimized for operation by vehicle passengers (and no, we’re not entirely sure what that means, either; we’ll let you know more if we get a chance to swing by the booth), it’s ruggedized to withstand the sort of extreme environments a car can go through, from sub-zero cold to Saharan heat. It’ll even survive a crash, supposedly. It also sees integration with car systems, controling settings, and accessing the vehicle’s audio output.

Hardware-wise, we’re looking at a 10.2-inch full HD panel, and a Tegra 4 under the hood – far from the most popular SoC choice, but one that’s finally starting to make some inroads.

What’s really unclear, though, are Audi’s launch plans. While it’s showing the Mobile Audi Smart Display off, we haven’t heard any actual confirmation that it intends to bring it to market anytime soon. So even if this does sound like a pretty easy product to prepare for a commercial launch, we just don’t know where Audi’s going with it. Perhaps we’ll learn more about that soon.

Source: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!