Audi and Google to introduce Android-equipped cars at CES?

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If you’ve got a car, and you’ve got a smartphone, odds are good that you’ve taken advantage of the one to help you out with the other. That could be as simple as using Bluetooth to stream music from your phone to your car’s audio system, or maybe you even have a full-fledged car dock and often find yourself popping in your phone for use as a navigation aid. Whatever the nature of that relationship, it’s a common one, and one that’s likely to get a lot more intimate in the future; just as Apple readies its own iOS in the Car project, rumors now suggest that Audi and Google plan to introduce their own Android-based car system at the 2014 CES.

Before you start getting any crazy ideas about Android being used for some kind of auto-driving AI – well, Google and Audi ARE both working on systems like that, but neither is what we’re talking about today; this system is described specifically as being for “entertainment and information” purposes. Still, that “information” bit could be eminently useful – while it works just fine on your phone, imagine the convenience of having something like Waze baked-in to your car itself.

Sure, this isn’t the first time we’ve heard of Android in the car – the idea’s been kicking around for years – but auto makers are now getting involved in record numbers with bringing this sort of tech to their fleets, and with all the effort Apple’s making on its own front, it’s nice to hear that Google won’t necessarily be left at a disadvantage.

Source: The Wall Street Journal
Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!