Samsung teases Exynos news for CES 2014

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Samsung is hoping to be one of the early Android OEMs making the move to 64-bit devices, as it works to release hardware running 64-bit versions of the company’s Exynos SoCs. We’ve been talking about these chips first finding their way into commercial hardware as we start moving into 2014, but just when will that be? The question is back on our mind this evening as we see Samsung tease some sort of Exynos announcement for the CES.

The thing is – will this necessarily be about 64-bit chips? Samsung’s tweet and the accompanying image you see above don’t make any obvious reference to 64-bit components. That needn’t mean that they’re off the table entirely – maybe Samsung’s just being subtle with its promotion – but there’s also a possible alternate explanation.

For the past couple weeks, Samsung’s been using an #UnlockExynos hashtag in its tweets. These have been tied to a contest the company’s running, and in explaining that offer it notes “the contest will run through the 2014 International CES conference in Las Vegas, where we will release information about how Exynos is ‘pioneering way-ahead mobilization.’”

Could it be possible that all this “unlock” business is about a heterogeneous multi-processing update for existing Exynos 5 Octa chips – “unlocking” them for increased performance? We’ve heard about work towards such a release, but haven’t seen any results. And frankly, CES might just be too early for the launch of a 64-bit Exynos. Either way, we’ll be sure to bring you news of the announcement once it finally breaks.

Source: Samsung (Twitter)
Via: Sammy Hub

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!