Moto X wood option finally available (with some surprises)

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Motorola’s been clear that those long-overdue wooden back options for custom Moto X designs were on their way; we heard that the plan was to get them out in time for the holidays, and just yesterday we saw Motorola teasing their arrival. We weren’t sure just when that might happen, but it sure felt like an announcement was right on the tip of the company’s tongue. It turns out we didn’t have much longer to go at all, and today we see the first Moto X wooden option arrive – though not exactly as we thought it might.

So, where did our expectations mislead us? Well, for starters, we’re not getting the four wood options once promised – or at least, not yet, anyway. Instead of bamboo, teak, rosewood, and ebony, we just get bamboo. Hopefully the rest are still coming at some point, though that’s not yet confirmed.

Then there’s the pricing: while it appeared from site data that these wood options would all cost $50 more than regular Moto Maker designs, we now learn that this bamboo option comes at a hefty $100 premium. Even $50 was on the steep side, so we worry that this pricing may scare away a lot of shoppers.

Finally, shipping times for this new bamboo option are delayed: order today, and you’ve probably got another 20 days to go before your new phone arrives. Ultimately, that means that no one’s actually going to have this phone in time for the holidays – or for any of 2013, for that matter.

Source: Motorola

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!