Ubuntu Touch smartphones still happening: Canonical secures mystery hardware partner

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This past summer, Canonical tried something pretty darn ambitious when it attempted to crowdsource the funding for the Ubuntu Edge, a smartphone that besides dual-booting into Android, would natively run the new Ubuntu Touch OS. Ultimately, the project didn’t reach its goal, so the Edge is never going to happen. Even without any hardware, the OS has lived on, and a couple months back we saw the first formal release of the platform for installation on existing Android devices. But what about the dream of a native Ubuntu Touch phone? It’s still in the works, and today we get confirmation from Canonical that it’s secured its first hardware partner.

Unfortunately, Canonical is keeping quiet about just who it’s tapped for this honor; we don’t know if we’re looking at an LG, Huawei, ZTE, Oppo, or someone else entirely. All we know for now is that the plan is to make the platform available on “high-end” hardware (which would fit with the proposed goals for the Ubuntu Edge) sometime next year.

So far, platform upstarts have had a rough time. Firefox OS hasn’t made a big splash, and the recent arrival of the first Jolla Sailfish OS phone has similarly not managed to win over swaths of new fans. Ubuntu’s already got a big PC following, but will that be enough to draw users to its phone offerings? We’re right curious to find out.

Source: CNET

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!