Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 Lite specs start showing up, but they don’t make a lot of sense

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Samsung already has a pretty diverse tablet lineup, but last week we heard that it might be planning to differentiate its offerings even more, with the introduction of a new Lite version of its Galaxy Tab family. The rumor suggested that a Galaxy Tab 3 Lite could arrive in just about a month from now, but we struggled to put our finger on just how Samsung might make this tablet “Lite” – that is, the existing Galaxy Tab 3 models weren’t exactly high-end to begin with. Well, today we start getting our answers about how this hardware looks like it will launch, and frankly, we’re still not sure what’s “Lite” about the whole thing.

For starters, we now have some model numbers, with SM-T110 and SM-T111 both attached to these rumors. Armed with those, we can see stuff like the T111 showing up in an Indian import database, where it’s identified as a seven-inch tablet.

Looking into an official User Agent Profile, we also see signs of a 1024 x 600 resolution and a Cortex A9-based SoC running at 1.2GHz.

Thing is: all that sounds exactly like the existing Galaxy Tab 3 7.0. In fact, there’s nothing at all to what we’ve heard about this model so far to explain the Lite in its name. Not even the pricing makes much sense; while this Tab 3 Lite is rumored to sell for about $135, the Tab 3 7.0 sells for more like $170 – how is Samsung going to cut the price by 20% without changing the specs?

Source: Zauba, Samsung (XML)
Via: The Droid Guy, Sammy Today

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!