Nexus 5 camera fixes confirmed for Android 4.4.1 – Update: arriving today

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Update: Google has confirmed that 4.4.1 is on its way out as of today. If you’re comfortable with sideloading updates over ADB, the Nexus 5 4.4.1 update is available for download here.

It was just yesterday that we were telling you about signs pointing to Google’s work on Android 4.4.1, as various Nexus models apparently running the in-development release connected to web servers across the internet, making their presence known. We speculated about some possible improvements the update might deliver, like fixes for bugs that have come to light or a much-needed tweak to the Nexus 5’s camera, but didn’t have any particular assurances of what to expect. Well, today we start getting some answers, as Android Director of Engineering David Burke talks about the pending 4.4.1 release, and shares news of just that Nexus 5 camera attention we were hoping for.

The update should greatly improve focus times on the Nexus 5, increase shutter speed in well-lit environments for less motion blur, and enhance white balance. The app itself will be faster to launch, and an HDR status bar is just the first of what promise to be many changes to the camera UI within the app. That sounds like fantastic news all around.

As for availability, it could be here much sooner than we had hoped for. While the only-very-recent evidence of testing had us thinking that distribution could still be a couple weeks off, the word today is that 4.4.1 could hit Nexus phones in just a matter of days.

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Source: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!