Pantech Vega Secret Note off to a strong start in South Korea; should Samsung be worried?

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A little over a month ago, we saw Pantech launch its Vega Secret Note phablet. With a 5.9-inch 1080p display, Snapdragon 800 SoC, 13-megapixel camera, and 3GB of RAM – not to mention the name Pantech gave it – the phone seemed destined for comparisons to Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3. It’s easy to dismiss the Vega Secret Note as a ripoff, lacking premium features like a stylus that uses an active digitizer panel, as opposed to the capacitive pen Pantech provides, but we’re now learning that sales of the phone have been off to a solid start, and Samsung might have something to be worried about.

Just one month in, Pantech’s sold 200,000 of these phones – just in South Korea. For a country with a population of 50M, that’s not too shabby. Corresponding figures for the Note 3 aren’t available, but word is that the phone’s reception in its native country has been a bit chilly, and much like with the GN4, Samsung’s been struggling to see the sales it desires.

Granted, Samsung’s still king of the phablet game and likely will be for the foreseeable future, but that doesn’t mean that pressure from Pantech isn’t real, and Samsung may find itself struggling to keep the Note line as competitive as it has been. As for Pantech, it’s possible this success may encourage the company to attempt Vega Secret Note sales in additional markets.

Source: ZDNet Korea (Google Translate)
Via: Unwired View

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!