Google Play Music app with All Access lands on iOS

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It’s been a long time coming: a native Google Play Music app for iOS, and one supporting Google’s streaming All Access premium service, as well. We’ve been talking about the idea since back in May, though things really picked up early last month, when rumors started getting loud about an imminent launch. Claims of an October release date ended up falling through, but as we hit the midway point through November, Google has finally come through, delivering the app to the App Store this morning.

Ultimately, the long wait for the app has been blamed on a desire “to bring it up to the level of polish expected from Play Music and iOS apps,” though there had been speculation that Apple’s desire to get a cut of Play Music income might have played a role. While that theory’s since been rejected, it turns out that rather than fighting Apple, Google just elected to steer clear of the whole mess: you can’t make any purchases directly through the new app, and even signing up for All Access must be done externally.

As for the app itself, it’s missing stuff like the “I’m Feeling Lucky” station for the moment, though that should be coming soon, along with adjustments to make the app a better fit for the iPad.

We’re not sure Google has a shot at drawing iOS users away from Apple’s own music services, but this all sounds like a nice addition for primarily Android users who might also have an iOS device on the side.

Source: iTunes
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!