NVIDIA Tegra Note 7 opens for pre-orders, ships next week; anybody interested?

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For once, let’s try and talk about NVIDIA without getting too caught up in its SoC struggles so far in 2013 – the past is the past, and right now NVIDIA is looking to move forward, repositioning itself as not just the company behind a mobile SoC, but as a designer of products build around such chips in its own right. That’s meant devices like the Shield gaming console, and more recently the Tegra Note tablet. After announcing that tablet platform back in September, it’s finally time for the slate to start arriving, and today NVIDIA details the start of US sales.

As you’ll remember, NVIDIA isn’t manufacturing Tegra Note devices itself, and instead provides partners with a reference design for them to use. We’d already talked about companies like HP which announced their intent to produce Tegra Note devices, but today we’re looking at EVGA – the company you might know better from its graphics cards – as NVIDIA’s US launch partner for the Tegra Note.

Newegg’s now taking pre-orders for the EVGA Tegra Note 7, which will run you just about $200. It’s powered by a 1.8GHz Tegra 4, has 1GB of RAM, 16GB storage, and sports a seven-inch 1280 x 800 display with an included stylus. Compared to models like the Nexus 7, that doesn’t sound like very much hardware for your money, so we’re curious to see if NVIDIA’s able to find any success with it – perhaps gamers will flock to Tegra-optimized titles, but there’s already some steep competition in the tablet market.

Source: NVIDIA

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!