Start saving now for Panasonic’s pricey 4K Windows 8.1 tablet

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Samsung may be stretching its tablet lineup to new sizes with the Galaxy Note 12.2, but compared to some models from other manufacturers, even that’s comparatively tiny. Remember all the way back in January, when we were still drooling over everything CES had to reveal? One of the boundary-pushing products we saw announced was a massive twenty-inch tablet from Panasonic, with a 4K 3840 x 2560 panel that put everyone else to shame. We went hands on with the Windows 8 device at the time, and learned that Panasonic aimed to get this behemoth selling before the end of 2013. We’d practically forgotten about it by now, but with just weeks to go before the year’s out, we’re finally getting the details on how it will come to the States.

It turns out Panasonic’s not going to meet that year-end deadline, at least not for this US release, with the tablet now slated for sales beginning in January 2014. The Toughpad 4K UT-MB5 – as it’s formally known – packs a Core i5 CPU, NVIDIA GeForce 745M GPU, a 256GB SSD, and 8GB RAM. As you should rightfully expect, this combination demands a pretty hefty price tag, but it’s still a bit shocking just how high: this baby will run you a solid $6000.

That makes the UT-MB5 the sort of tablet that businesses might turn to, but don’t count on seeing these flying of the shelves of your local Target. That’s a shame, because there might just be a market for jumbo-sized tablets like this if the pricing was more in the under-$2000 range.

Source: PC World

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!