Samsung may have to skip optical stabilization for Galaxy S 5

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Optical image stabilization is a funny technology. It definitely offers some real-world benefits – even the words in its name sound pretty high-end and technical – but it’s not a magic bullet that’s going to turn your smartphone into a Steadicam. Still, it’s a feature that the public’s been clamoring for, and we’ve already seen it show in in a few phones. Over the past several months, we’ve been talking about Samsung’s approach to OIS, looking at a couple modules that could make their way onto the company’s upcoming phones. While we’ve mentioned the Galaxy S 5 as one model that just might end up with a stabilized camera, a new rumor claims that the camera component won’t be ready in time for the handset.

The story is a familiar one, and has shades of all those Galaxy Note 3 fingerprint rumors that went unfulfilled: problems with manufacturing, low yield rates, and ultimately just not enough components to go around for a device that’s going to sell at the sort of flagship levels the GS5 will attract.

At least, that’s what these industry sources say, but we’re still not even sold on an ETA for the GS5; maybe if Samsung really is looking to launch the phone in the early winter of 2014 this might be a problem, but what if the launch is further out into Spring?

Even if the GS5 doesn’t get OIS, it should still pop up on later Samsung models, perhaps like the Galaxy Note 4.

Source: ETNews (Google Translate)
Via: SamMobile

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!