MediaTek’s eight-cores-at-once SoC shows up in first Android

Advertisement

The smartphone core race may finally be coming to an end. 2013 brought us plenty of new SoC designs, but quad-core still reigns supreme. Still, the allure of octa-core chips has been too much for some manufacturers to resist, as we saw with Samsung and its Exynos 5 Octa. Still, should that really count, without all eight cores pumping away at once? Not content to leave that question hanging, some firms have endeavored to deliver proper full eight-cores-at-once SoC. We know Samsung’s working on something along those lines, and software updates might even bring that mode to existing Exynos 5 Octa chips. MediaTek’s been developing an eight-core chip of its own, and today we hear about the first handset to feature it, the UMI X2S.

The what X2S? Yeah, we know: UMI is a Chinese brand that’s pretty unknown to Western audiences, and you probably shouldn’t count on seeing this handset pop up in a store near you anytime soon, but using MediaTek’s octa-core MT6592 SoC still makes it noteworthy.

The X2S runs that MT6592 at 1.5GHz, has a five-inch 1080p display, 2GB of RAM, a 13-megapixel camera, and 32GB flash storage – not too shabby, all considering. Even with this brand new chip, the phone should still be pretty affordable, selling for what works out to $245, with higher-end options (more flash, we assume) going for more like $330.

Source: GSM Insider
Via: phoneArena

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!