Google event invites go out… but reportedly not for the Nexus 5?

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Google’s Nexus 5 launch failing to take place this past Tuesday was no big deal. We only had some secondhand rumors to go by, and there wasn’t a hint of hard evidence to support the theory. Sure – it made enough sense, but so would have any day this week. In any case, we’ve gone back to keeping up with all the additional Nexus 5 leaks that continue to slip out, waiting patiently for a more accurate assessment of when this launch might really happen. While we’ve heard some “imaginative” theories, what we’d love to see is Google just start sending out its invites, taking away any more guesswork. This afternoon, Google certainly did begin distributing invitations to an October 24 event, but it might not be what we’ve been hoping for.

The invites themselves make no specific mention of Nexus devices, instead putting the focus on Google Play. Still, Nexus devices get sold in the Play Store, so that might all fall under the same umbrella, right?

Not so fast. Multiple sources have been reporting that this really is just going to be about showing off Google Play media and services, and Google has absolutely no intention of breaking any news – and that includes launches of new hardware.

Still, this is near-baffling. The Nexus 5 seems like it’s just aching to go public, and this event would have been a perfect time to debut the phone. Does Google intend to have a separate Nexus event, just a week or so after this one? Could the Nexus 5 be much farther off than we’ve been expecting?

Source: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!