Pantech launches fingerprint-scanning Vega Secret Note with Snapdragon 800, 3GB RAM, and stylus

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We are on a bit of a kick when it comes to new phablets this morning; we only just wrapped-up telling you about LG’s new G Pro Lite, the company’s budget-minded 5.5-inch handset, and now Pantech has gone official with a phablet of its own, the 5.9-inch Vega Secret Note.

This phone managed to show itself a little early, and though its specs were rumored at the time, both the phone’s name (now adding that “secret” bit) and some of those details were off.

For instance, instead of 2GB as rumored, the Secret Note gets a forward-thinking 3GB of LPDDR3 RAM. The other specs are similarly high-end, including a Snapdragon 800 SoC, 1080p display, 13-megapixel main camera, and 1080p-capable front-facer. There’s a 3200mAh battery, and 32GB internal storage. The Secret Note will ship running Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean.

Around back, you’ll find the fingerprint scanner we saw in leaked pics. And what’s a phablet without a stylus; it may not use a fancy digitizer like the Note 3’s but Pantech’s thrown in a capacitive pen for good measure.

Pantech may not be the most appreciated brand around, but we’ve got to admit that the hardware assembled here looks pretty darn decent, and even the aesthetics aren’t too bad. Look for it to sell for what works out to about $840 when it finally hits retail in South Korea.

Source: Pantech (Google Translate)
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!