Google may drop ASUS for next year’s Nexus 7

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Is it too early to already start talking about the next-generation Nexus 7 tablet? We’ve only had a little more than two months with the 2013 Nexus 7, which is a totally solid tablet in its own right, and rumors are already chirping away about what might be in the works for next year’s model. Instead of anything like specs or capabilities, though, today’s rumor puts forth the idea that maybe Google won’t be inviting ASUS back to the party, and could go with another OEM.

At least, that’s the notion we’re hearing trumpeted this evening, though we’re not quite sure how much faith to put in it just yet. All this talk stems from a single line – almost an aside – in a Digitimes piece about ASUS’s tablet business. By and large, the story talks about whether or not ASUS is shooting itself in the foot by cranking out just so many different tablets. But then there’s the idea: that ASUS is going so nuts about building up its tablet sales now because a rumor claims that the company won’t be tapped for next-gen Nexus 7 production.

That leaves us with more questions than answers, though. Where exactly did this rumor come from in the first place? Is this theory just being extrapolated from the recent glut of ASUS tablets, or is there actually some meat to it? And why might this be decided quite so early? We heard that Google started throwing together its first Nexus 7 plans in January 2012, so any decisions at this point about OEM partners for the 2014 model make it sounds like Google’s getting a serious head start. That, or these rumors are missing the mark.

Source: Digitimes
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!