Android 4.4 hands-on reveals new features to expect

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It’s been about a month now since Google surprised everyone looking forward to Key Lime Pie with its announcement that Android 4.4. would arrive as KitKat, instead. That may be how the software eventually gets here, but it wasn’t always like this – remember, it wasn’t just us speculating about that Key Lime Pie name, and we had plenty of indications from Google employees to back that up. Today, we get to learn a little more about the software thanks to a hands-on run-in with an older build, back when it was still going by that KLP moniker.

So, what’s new? There’s a bunch of new stuff popping up in phone settings, including a way to manage payment options, presumably for the likes of Google Wallet. We also see a way to configure the phone for use with printers. It looks like Miracast support will be a built-in, for easy to connection to wireless displays.

The photo editor gets some new tricks, like a tilt-shift effect, and we see this new integrated printing stuff extend to the photo gallery – beyond just sending an image to a printer, it can also generate PDFs. There are few changes to the phone’s UI, but it all sounds pretty minor – mostly adjustments to colors. That should all look a bit smoother, too, thanks to new optimizations. Finally, more Google apps could be bundled by default, including Drive, Keep, and Quickoffice.

Since this dates from an older build, it’s always possible some of this might be cut or further refined before release, but at least this gives us a starting point for what to expect.

Source: Gadget Helpline
Via: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!