Oppo launches the N1, complete with CyanogenMod option

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Microsoft’s not the only one with new hardware this morning, and Oppo finally introduces us to its N1 Android, along with some unusual camera design and a special ROM tie-in.

Oppo’s been teasing this phone since last week, and although we were expecting innovations like a rear touch panel, we got a few additional surprises. Let’s start with the basic hardware layout:

The N1 has a 5.9-inch 1080p display, runs a 1.7GHz Snapdragon 600, and has 2GB of RAM. It sports a beefy 3610mAh battery, and that rear touch panel is confirmed, measuring twelve square centimeters. It will be available in 16GB and 32GB configurations, and measures 9mm thick.

The phone’s camera is an interesting twist on the higher-res front-facers we’ve been seeing lately, though not at all how anyone’s been doing it to date. Instead of a more capable stand-alone front-facer, the camera’s rear camera is pivoted, allowing you to twist it around and face forward. It’s got a 13 megapixel sensor, dual-mode LED, and has an aperture of f/2.0.

For remote camera control, the N1 comes with a Bluetooth Low Energy remote, letting you actuate the shutter from 50 meters away.

As for software, Oppo is giving users a choice. The N1 can either run Oppo’s ColorOS, an Android 4.2 fork, or CyanogenMod, marking the first hardware partnership to stem from the project’s recent incorporation as Cyanogen Inc.

China will get the N1 next month, with the 16GB model selling for what works out to about $570. International editions should follow later, sometime in December.

Source: Oppo
Via: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!