Jolla gets specific with hardware details for first Sailfish OS smartphone

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While Windows Phone and BlackBerry continue to elbow at each other for third place in the mobile race, a number of smartphone upstarts have been arising to bring a little new competition to the face-off. We’ve talked about Firefox OS and Ubuntu, but another interesting contender has been Jolla with its Sailfish OS born from the ashes of MeeGo. Back in May the company shared some general hardware info about the phone that would launch as the first Sailfish handset, though we lacked a number of specifics: a 4.5-inch screen, but what resolution? A dual-core SoC, but whose, and which chip? Today Jolla took to Facebook with a number of answers, confirming many hardware details.

That screen? Look for a qHD component. And the dual-core SoC? It’s a Snapdragon of some flavor, running at 1.4GHz, with access to 1GB of RAM. We already knew about the eight-megapixel main camera, and see here that there are plans for a two-megapixel front-facer. The phone will have 16GB internal storage, expandable via microSD, and the user-replaceable battery will be a 2100mAh component.

While those specs are quite far removed from the cutting edge, we never expected Jolla to be about pushing any hardware boundaries, and the user experience will be more about Sailfish and the software. In that light, this might be a perfectly serviceable handset, and hopefully these hardware choices will help keep the price nice and low.

Source: Jolla (Facebook)
Via: the::unwired

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!