Are chip shortages keeping the Snapdragon 800 out of the HTC One Max?

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By now, we’ve seen the HTC One Max six ways from Sunday; its most recent appearance put the handset up against the Galaxy Note II and 3. Underneath all that, a mystery’s been trying to work itself out: just what SoC would this phablet run? While early rumors and frankly, common sense, suggested that we’d be seeing a Snapdragon 800, more recently there’s been talk that the One Max might go a different route, running either an S4 Pro or maybe a 600. Today, a new rumor attempts to get to the bottom of why HTC isn’t just giving the phone an 800.

Supposedly, supply issues could be forcing HTC’s hand. According to some supply chain sources, heavy interest in the Snapdragon 800 means that Qualcomm doesn’t have enough to go around, and HTC feared that using the chip in the One Max would negatively affect the handset’s availability. Rather than having multiple versions of the phablet, Note-3-style, HTC may have wanted to keep things simple and have a unified One Max design.

On the flip side, there are other rumors claiming that this isn’t the case at all, that Qualcomm has already ramped-up production, and HTC just wants to save a few bucks manufacturing the One Max. That sort of penny-pinching doesn’t exactly fill us with confidence, so we’re curious to find out if we’ll ever learn the truth behind this decision – assuming this really is how the One Max will arrive.

Source: Digitimes
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!