Verizon LG G2 offered at early low price, has unusual root status indicator

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The LG G2 has arrived, and we’ve been spending the past several days bringing you some unboxings and hands-on comparisons featuring the new phone. This afternoon, we have a couple interesting bits of news to bring you about the Verizon edition of this phone in specific.

First up, we’ve heard about a really great price for the Verizon G2, if you’ve been thinking about picking one up. If you go through the carrier directly, that would mean shelling out about $200 for the phone on-contract. That’s by no means excessive for the launch price of a new flagship, but there’s a better deal out there.

Over at retailer LetsTalk, you can order an on-contract Verizon LG G2 for as little as $30. That’s the price for new customers, but even the upgrade price is a huge improvement over Verizon’s, only setting you back about $80.

We’ve also caught wind about some odd behavior for how this Verizon version of the G2 keeps track of the phone’s root status. Built right in to the handset’s status screen, there’s an entry that displays whether or not the G2 is rooted – an item absent from every other G2 variant. Speculation suggests that Verizon is trying to make things easier for itself in denying warranty claims due to the users rooting their phones – just something to be aware of if you do decide to start tinkering with your new G2.

Source: LetsTalk, Android Police
Via: Droid-life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!