New theory rejects last week’s “Nexus 5” FCC doc discovery

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Beyond the IFA, and all the new hardware that brought to light, last week also marked the arrival of some new information possibly pertaining to the release of the next Nexus smartphone, with the publication of some FCC certification paperwork that might just be for an LG-made Nexus 5. While that Nexus name itself didn’t pop up, there was a whole lot of circumstantial evidence, not the least of which were some case images that sure seemed to match the camera placement we saw in the image of the possible Nexus 5 candidate from a video shot on Google’s campus. This week, however, we hearing about a possible alternate explanation for this handset.

According to tipster @evleaks, this model we saw at the FCC, the LG D820, should instead be a CDMA version of the G2. In apparent support of this, he offers a screenshot from a database showing the LG 821 identified as a CDMA G2, in contrast to the GSM version, the LG D802. While this doesn’t directly ID the D820, the proximity of this numbering makes it seem far more likely that the D820 would be very closely related to the D821, likely differing only in band configuration, than that the D820 would be the Nexus 5 and D821 would be a regular LG phone. For instance, while the LG Optimus G uses model numbers like E971 and E973, the Nexus 4 itself is E960.

Still, there are problems with this idea. Why would a CDMA G2 see its camera moved, and apparently lose its rear volume controls? Why don’t those body dimensions from the D820 filing match these leaked specs for the D821? We’ll be trying to account for these apparent discrepancies as we continue to look for the arrival of new Nexus 5 info.

Source: @evleaks 1,2 (Twitter)
Via: Android Spin

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!