Is Samsung kidding itself with its Galaxy Gear sales goals?

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The Galaxy Gear may not be the end-all, be-all smartwatch messiah that we were hoping for, but it does look to have some great integration with Samsung software, and we imagine that a wrist-mounted camera is going to be appealing to plenty of people. However, will the watch find acceptance at quite the level that Samsung’s hoping for? The company’s been talking a little about its sales goals, and we’re wondering if its not setting the bar just a smidge too high.

Samsung wants to see somewhere between 20 and 30% of new Galaxy Note 3 owners also take home a Galaxy Gear with them. While others have called this a conservative estimate, we’re not so sure; even with Samsung’s marketing muscle, asking shoppers to drop another $300 on a purchase after they’ve just paid that much (or more, without subsidies) on a Note 3 itself might be pushing its luck a little.

Then again, if Samsung gets a little more aggressive with Gear sales, quickly moving to reduce its price or offer bundle discounts, we might be rethinking things. Problem is, what we’ve seen so far – like Verizon offering the Note 3 together with the Galaxy Gear for $600 – still has the Gear at full price.

Maybe if the Galaxy Gear was a $100 accessory for the Note 3, Samsung could be seeing that 1-in-4 adoption it’s hoping for, but the way things are now, this one’s looking like a tough sell.

Source: ZDNet Korea (Google Translate)
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!