BlackBerry exec outlines need to trim the fat, aims to become “niche company”

Advertisement

Over the past month, we’ve seen BlackBerry finally start facing some hard realities about its place in the market. While in the past, the idea of selling off parts of the company might have been solely the stuff of gossip, news that the company is now looking to “explore strategic alternatives” to the way it’s done business in the past has made it seem like anything was a possibility – that maybe desperation was beginning to rear its ugly head and force BlackBerry to admit the precarious situation it found itself in. Now, we hear a little more about possible plans for the future, with one BlackBerry boardmember discussing what assets the company should sell in order to better compete as a “niche” performer.

BlackBerry director Bert Nordberg says in a recent interview that certain “subsets” within the company aren’t needed going forward, and BlackBerry may be better off selling them. Unfortunately, he declined to go into detail regarding just what fat we’re talking about trimming, so it’s unclear which of the many possible niche markets – hardware, platform, or enterprise services – Nordberg sees as part of BlackBerry’s future.

Ultimately, it sounds like the name of the game is going to be scaling back ambitions and divorcing the company of the notion that it’s ever going to be competing on the same level as Android or iOS. For now, it needs to decide exactly where it wants to end up, and start shedding the extra weight that may be holding it back from getting there.

Source: The Wall Street Journal
Via: BGR

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!