Moto Maker now offers fully online sales, as well as off-contract orders

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Motorola’s online Moto Maker tool launched last week for users interested in customizing some new Moto X handsets, but its arrival wasn’t without a few problems. Among the many issues that crept up, users weren’t able to add custom messages to their hardware, nor was Motorola able to meet its promised four-day turnaround time on orders. There was also the odd business about how you’d have to hoof it to a physical AT&T store to get a special access card with a code you’d enter on the Moto Maker site, as well as claims that AT&T wasn’t issuing such cards to users interested in buying off-contract handsets. There are still some big issues remaining, but today Motorola addresses a number of those concerns, and greatly simplifies the ordering process.

For instance, now you can just go right to the Moto Maker site and start customizing, without needing any AT&T code card. When you’re done, and ready to put your purchase through, you can create a new account or add the Moto X to an existing one. This also introduces the option for off-contract sales of the Moto X, but keep in mind that these still count as AT&T devices, and we’re presumably looking at SIM locks.

There’s also a clear assessment of how long it will take to get your custom handset, with the backlog now delivering phones about 8 days post-order.

If you want a full-on carrier-free Moto X, that developer edition is just around the corner. So are models for additional carriers, like the Verizon Moto X coming on August 29.

Source: Motorola
Via: Droid-life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!