Samsung ATIV Q dual Win/Android tablet latest casualty in patent wars?

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Back in June, Samsung threw a London event to help introduce us to phones like the Galaxy S 4 Active, Mini, and Zoom, as well as to share news of a couple new tablets. One of those, the ATIV Q, really caught our eye for a number of reasons: it had an intriguing convertible design with integrated keyboard and stand, packed a crazy high-res 3200 x 1800 display, and allowed users to jump back and forth between Windows 8 and Android, for the best of both worlds. Problem is, we haven’t heard much of the tablet since, and now a new rumor suggests that patent issues have seriously derailed Samsung’s plans for the ATIV Q.

Our source here is a Korean site, and the auto-translation’s a little wonky, but the gist of it seems to be that unexpected patent disputes concerning the tablet have surfaced, and while it’s not publicly talking about how any of that might affect the ATIV Q’s release, Samsung is reportedly very embarrassed about this development and working to keep the whole thing quiet.

We’re not clear exactly what this patent entails nor who holds it, but it’s apparently tied to the dual-OS feature that’s one of the tablet’s big claims to fame. Since that’s not exactly something Samsung could just remove and expect the public to readily accept, it even sounds like the company might go so far as to just kill the tablet altogether.

Source: ZDNet Korea (Google Translate)
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!