Will the plastic iPhone 5C be a scratch magnet? Informal test offers hope

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There sure have been enough leaks of iPhone 5C (and 5S) hardware over the past several months, and it seems that every time some new imagery of the 5C surfaces, everyone gangs up to start chucking insults at the new plastic construction and the perception of how low quality and cheap it makes the phone look. Knowing Apple, though, we had to believe that the company wasn’t just going to let this product go to crap, and that its decision to use a plastic body wouldn’t necessarily mean making a lot of sacrifices in quality. Today, we get to look at a quick test run to see how well the iPhone 5C might stand up to abuse, and this “cheap” plastic sure looks like it might do a decent job resisting scratches.

Without any tools to measure force, or cutting surfaces of established hardness, this is very far removed from a scientific assessment: just throwing the phone in a bag with a number of potentially abrasive items and shaking things up. Still, that is the sort of damage our phones take on a daily basis, so maybe it’s not wholly without utility. We also see some more direct interactions, rubbing hard objects directly against the 5C’s casing, and all without any apparent marring of the glossy finish.

We’ll probably be curious to see a little better controlled experiment attempt to fully establish the 5C’s resistance to scratching once the phone finally arrives, but this demo, at least, has us optimistic for a pretty strong performance.

Source: Apple Daily (Google Translate)
Via: iClarified

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!