Should we already be concerned by low Nokia Lumia 1020 interest?

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Nokia’s Lumia 1020 is one smartphone with a lot going for it – at the risk of sounding like a broken record, its 41-megapixel PureView sensor makes the phone’s imaging capabilities second-to-none, and a number of us here at Pocketnow are big fans of the phone. But beyond all that it can do itself, the 1020’s also a strategically important smartphone, and could serve to do wonders for the Windows Phone platform. That is, of course, assuming that the phone’s a hit. Though the handset has only just become available, there’s already some evidence suggesting it’s failing to attract the desired audience.

How do we know how well the 1020’s doing? Well, we don’t have any official numbers from the likes of Nokia, but there is one publicly accessible ranking we can observe: how the 1020 is doing on Amazon’s chart of AT&T best-sellers. Unsurprisingly, models like the HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S III/4 dominate (at least, since you won’t find on-contract iPhone sales). As we move past the top 15, Windows Phone models start appearing, like the 900 and 920, followed by the HTC 8X. We have to head all the way down to spot 24 before the 1020 shows its face.

The worse bit: a day ago, the 1020 was up in spot 13. In just one day, a new, high-profile phone dropped off its exclusive carrier’s top-20 listing. That shouldn’t be.

Clearly, we need more data before we start calling it on the 1020, but this is not an ideal sign to see from a new phone like this.

Source: Amazon
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!