App pays you to view lock screen ads

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Remember back in early March when we told you about SmartAds? The startup was trying to develop a program that would pay smartphone users up to $25 a month in order to view ads placed on the lock screens of their phones. It sounded pretty ambitious… but then absolutely bombed at its fundraising attempt, pulling in less than $1500 of the $50,000 it was looking for to get SmartAds off the ground. The idea lives on, though, and an app called Locket has recently come to Android, offering a similar deal.

Just like SmartAds was attempting to do, Locket replaces your Android lock screen with its app, displaying an ad each time you wake your phone. You can either engage with the ad to get more info, or dismiss it with a swipe, just like a normal lock screen interaction.

So, what’s the catch? You can forget that $25 a month jazz – Locket pays one cent per ad you view, and right now caps that at three an hour. If you wholly forgo sleep and hit that three-an-hour target day in, day out, for a whole month, you’ll make a little over $22. Real life users might hope to take in $5-$10 a month, depending on use.

There have also been performance issues reported, Locket’s only available in the US, and there’s no current way to actually lock your phone with it (with a PIN or somesuch). Still, if you could use a little extra pocket change, it might be worth taking a look at.

Source: Locket
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!