South Korean smartphone users upset over GS4 refresh

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Just over a week ago, we checked out some certification paperwork that sure seemed to point to the existence of a new version of the Galaxy S 4. This model SHV-E330, apparently for the South Korean market, claimed support for high-speed LTE Advanced and ran a brand-new Snapdragon 800 SoC. Shortly thereafter, we heard Samsung confirm plans for just such an LTE Advanced version of the smartphone. While that 800 business wasn’t expressly mentioned then, a leaked manual subsequently backed up that theory. Now faced with this information, South Korean smartphone users who just dropped a lot of cash on what’s already becoming an outdated version of the Galaxy S 4 are up in arms.

Frankly, it’s an understandable complaint. It hasn’t even been two months yet since the Galaxy S 4 became available, so it’s difficult to believe that Samsung didn’t already have this project in some advanced stage of development back when it first launched the GS4 – with no way to know that something better was coming, customers flocked to a smartphone which they expected to remain state-of-the-art for the better part of the year to come.

From what little we’ve heard, it sounds like complaints are focused more on the issue of LTE Advanced than whatever processing improvements the 800 may offer. Unfortunately, there won’t be any software updates coming to bring LTE Advanced to existing models.

We can’t really picture any financially viable way Samsung might hope to make this situation right; it looks like all those early adopters are just going to have to learn to live with their first-gen GS4s.

Source: Yonhap News
Via: GSM Arena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!