Not (quite) dead yet: HP keeps webOS going with new certificate

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Today marks the anniversary of the release of the first webOS handset, the Palm Pre. As such, you’re bound to see plenty of nostalgic looks back on the much-beloved platform throughout the day – and we’re certainly no exception. But beyond all that, we have ourselves somewhat of an oddity today, with some actual webOS news crossing our desk – that’s saying something for a platform that’s been shuttered for the better part of two years.

This development concerns one of the key digital signatures webOS uses to authenticate communication with HP’s servers. Like a credit card, these certificates have expiration dates, and the root certificate necessary for services like the App Catalog to function is set to expire on July 23. Normally, a company would keep ahead of an event like that and get updated certificates out to users well in advance of such a date. The warning cry had been sounded about this webOS issue since last year, but we just weren’t sure what, if any action HP might take. With the clock running down, today HP announced the distribution of an automatic update that will install the necessary certificate.

Well, it’s automatic for users on webOS 2.1, at least, but if you’re on an older release you can manually pull down the HP App Catalog Update app to set things right. The only catch is that you need to remember to complete the action before the old certificate expires, so either get cracking before July 23, or be prepared to dial-back the clock on your webOS phone.

Source: HP
Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!