Why is Google recalling white Nexus 4 shipments?

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After months and months of sitting on the benches, the white Nexus 4 was finally called into the game last month, and we wrapped-up last week learning of the start of its sales in the Google Play Store. It all seemed to be going swimmingly, with Google even throwing in a free bumper case with orders. However, as that first wave of white Nexus 4 handsets starts shipping out to customers, we’re getting word that all might not be well, after all, and for some reason Google has been recalling packages.

For the moment, we can’t say how widespread incidents like this may be, but the fact that it’s happening at all is super-unusual; when’s the last time you ordered something online only to have the seller reverse delivery after the item already shipped?

Beyond wondering about the scope of this problem, we’re also quite curious about just what might motivate such an action in the first place. Did Google realize that the manufacturing quality wasn’t quite up to snuff – a very Apple-like move where it wants to make sure all the phone’s white is a consistent shade? Maybe it just forgot to include those free bumpers – though that could be resolved with a second shipment, so why recall the first? We just don’t know, and for the moment it’s all very weird.

Update: It looks like Google is calling this one a case of incorrectly assigned tracking numbers. The good news is that your new white Nexus 4 should still be on its way, and Google will be updating any affected shoppers with correct tracking info.

Source: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!