Apple’s last-minute push could bring streaming iRadio to WWDC 2013

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Is Apple going to debut a new streaming music service at this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference? Could the so-called iRadio really be about to launch? The timing sure seems right, with Google just going public with its own All Access system, but rumors from just a couple weeks back made it seem like Apple just couldn’t work out the licensing arrangements it needed with the major publishers, and iRadio might not be ready to go live. With the clock until WWDC 2013 ticking down, there’s some late-in-the-game news that suggests Apple might just be scurrying to get iRadio off the ground in time for the event, after all.

Reportedly, Apple was able to secure the deal it needed with Warner over the weekend, and already had a partial deal in place with Universal. That’s far from all Apple needs in order to get iRadio going, but the fact that it’s still trying to get these licenses together suggests that the company is very interested in wrapping this up before WWDC gets started next week.

The big reveal for WWDC 2013 is likely to be iOS 7, but it’s sounding less and less crazy that Apple might also have enough of these music licenses worked out that it could at least announce iRadio, if not actually be ready to start offering the service. Unlike the subscription Google Play Music All Access, iRadio could be ad-supported and free to use.

Source: New York Times
Via: 9to5 Mac

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!