HTC First Gets a Big Price Cut

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The HTC First is a surprisingly decent mid-ranger that has found itself more than a bit overshadowed by the Facebook Home software that comes pre-installed. That’s a bit of a shame, because your feelings about Facebook Home aside, the First is an attractive little phone in its own right and deserves to get some more attention. A week ago, we were musing about whether or not people would actually flock to the First, especially in light of heavyweights like the HTC One or Samsung Galaxy S 4 looking so tempting. At the time, the First was still going for about $100 on contract, so while it was cheaper than the One or GS4, it maybe wasn’t as affordable as it needed to be. That all changes now, with AT&T making the First essentially free-on-contract.

Truth be told, it’s not quite, but $1-on-contract doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. This new positioning sounds like a really great move on AT&T’s part to help sell the First, as it should look a whole lot more attractive that some of the carrier’s other cheapest models.

Perhaps better still, the savings carry over to the full-price, non-subsidized HTC First, which drops from $450 to $350. That’s Nexus 4 territory, and while the First doesn’t have Google’s special attention (and early access to software), its stock Android experience and high-density screen just might give the N4 a run for its money.

Source: AT&T
Via: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!