Google Glass Gets New Retail ETA, Bad News Arrives for Its App Potential

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Google Glass finally seems more real than ever, with early adopters now getting their hands on the headset. Even with that milestone reached, our enthusiasm for the product just took a little hit, after getting news of long waits and an uncertain future for apps on the platform.

As of just a couple month ago, we were hearing that the idea was to get Google Glass ready for its commercial launch sometime near the end of the year. Instead, Google’s Eric Schmidt now has us thinking that it could be even farther out. He explained in a recent interview that Google will tweak Glass based on feedback from these early adopters, and the final version will be “probably a year-ish away.”

Last week, we got word that Glass runs Android, rather than some wholly new software stack. While that had us optimistic for what kinds of innovative apps might be possible, we’ve got to put a damper on our expectations. As it turns out, Glass won’t allow any apps to run natively, and instead everything will rely on web-based apps. Without a built-in cellular radio, that could be a real problem. We’ve also learned that apps won’t have access to video input in a way that could allow for augmented reality-type behavior, which seemed like a perfect fit the platform. Suffice it to say, we’re disappointed, though Google could always expand what’s possible in future releases.

Source: Dvice, TechCrunch
Via: Droid-life, The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!