Facebook Chat Heads Migrate Over to iOS (With a Catch)

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Facebook’s Chat Heads have emerged as one of the most interesting aspects of Facebook Home, and when we saw them hit the recent Android update to Facebook Messenger, it became clear that these were going to be a much larger component of Facebook’s chat experience than a mere component of Facebook Home. Today, Facebook 6.0 arrives for the iPhone an iPad, and along with a new look for its News Feed, the app brings those same Chat Heads to iOS – sort of.

While the basic idea behind Chat Heads – little icons that let you jump from conversation to conversation with your friends – makes the leap to iOS intact, there are a few serious caveats. The big one is that these aren’t going to be the awesome, pervasive Chat Heads from Android, letting you keep a Facebook conversation going from within another app. Instead, Chat Heads will only live within the iOS Facebook app itself.

There’s still some value there, especially if you spend a fair amount of time in the app, meandering through all your friends’ walls, but it still diminishes the feature’s appeal.

The other problem is that not everyone can use Chat Heads just yet, even with the updated app. Facebook says it could still be several weeks before the feature gets enabled for all users.

Chat Head aside, the new Facebook also has that revamped News Feed we mentioned, and for the iPhone version it also adds stickers you can apply to messages – think of them as jumbo-sized emoji. Like the Chat Heads, it will take a while for them to show up, too.

Source: Apple App Store

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!