Samsung Struggling to Produce Enough Memory Chips?

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Smartphone manufacturers are no strangers to component shortages. Sometimes we’re talking about a new display that can’t be manufactured in quantities sufficient to meet demand. Other times, the shortage might be with a phone’s SoC instead – that’s certainly what we’ve heard rumored for cases like the Galaxy S 4, for instance, with not enough Exynos 5 Octas to go around. Today we’re once again looking at Samsung’s struggles with sourcing components, now that some new rumors claim that Samsung has turned to outsourcing to keep up with demand for memory chips.

Samsung is a huge manufacturer of both RAM and flash storage chips, which find homes in its own smartphones, among other products. According to Digitimes, demand for Samsung handsets is so great that the manufacturer has taken on some new suppliers in order to augment its own production capabilities.

From the sound of these reports, Samsung may use these third-party chips for other products, but Galaxy phones could still get priority for Samsung’s own in-house chips. As a result, it doesn’t sound like we should have to worry too much about Galaxy shortages, nor question whether the chips going into the company’s phones will continue to meet the same level of quality.

Still, if Samsung’s smartphone success continues to grow, we wonder what effect future demand may have on this memory situation.

Source: Digitimes
Via: BGR
Image: iFixit

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!