Record Number of Apps Culled From Play Store

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When we’re talking about a company turning a strict eye to the quality of apps it allows on its platform’s store, it sure seems like we’re usually discussing Apple, notorious for the heavy-handed oversight it wields over App Store submissions. Today, however, Google’s the one that appears to be cleaning house, as reports arrive that something like 60,000 low-quality apps were removed from the Play Store over the course of February.

Google hasn’t officially announced any such total, and instead the number’s been computed by a company doing its own app store analytics. That also means that we can’t quite say how many of those 60,000 were developers pulling their own apps, and how many were a result of Google’s action, but the sheer number we’re talking about suggests some sort of automated screening system.

Details on just why so many apps were deleted are also hard to come by, but the bulk of these titles seem to fall into the MP3/ringtone category, a subsection all too familiar with low-on-features, high-on-spam offerings.

With a grand total of around 700,000 apps in the Play Store, 60,000 makes up a decent percentage, and shows that Google is serious about getting rid of bad apps, even if they make it into the Store in the first place.

Source: TechCrunch
Via: Into Mobile

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!