T-Mobile Offers a $15 Per Month Wireless Data Plan You (Probably) Can’t Have

Advertisement

If you’ve ever shopped around for the best deals on wireless service in the US, T-Mobile’s offerings have no doubt caught your eye. Even before the company got started with its low-price, no-contract, “UNcarrier” plans, it had some great pre-paid options, including one with unlimited data that was a mere $30 a month. This week, the carrier announced a deal that blows even that one out of the water, bringing you wireless data for just $15 a month. Unfortunately, there’s one very big catch.

T-Mobile won’t sell you this plan for a smartphone, a tablet, or even a WiFi hotspot – unless that hotspot happens to have four wheels. See, Audi offers something called Audi Connect on its vehicles, using T-Mobile for its wireless data. The signal provides the connection for the car’s on-board systems, and it can also be routed though an in-vehicle wireless hotspot, bringing up to eight phones or tablets online.

While a normal monthly plan is $30, you can pre-pay for 30 months in advance, for only $450: that works out to just $15 a month. Oddly, there’s also a 24 month option for $600, giving you less service for more money.

We know, T-mobile doesn’t expect users to pull nearly as much data though their cars as they would with a stand-alone smartphone. But dang, a $15 monthly plan for something like a tablet would be a fantastic thing to have – the best the carrier has now is $15 for 300MB, and you only have a week to use it all. Also, Audi could be subsidizing some of this cost, but that doesn’t stop us from getting a little jealous.

Source: Audi
Via: MobileCrunch

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!