All T-Mobile iPhone 5 Options Get Priced

Advertisement

We weren’t sure it was going to happen, but sure enough, at yesterday’s UNcarrier event, T-Mobile announced the start of iPhone sales. The carrier will start selling them on April 12, and unlike the currently available GSM models, this one will offer 3G support on T-Mobile’s AWS band, in addition to T-Mobile LTE (where available). Yesterday, we got details on the 16GB version of the iPhone 5, but what about if you need a little more storage? Today, we can flesh things out with pricing and availability info for the 32GB and 64GB versions.

The 16GB iPhone 5 is going to run you about $100 upfront, and those $20 monthly payments over the next two years bring the full cost of ownership up to $580. Considering Apple wants $650 for an off-contract 16GB iPhone 5, T-Mobile saves you $70.

That much we knew, but now we can see how T-Mobile’s pricing works out for the larger capacity models. Initially, at least, there aren’t going to be available in T-Mobile stores, and anyone looking to get one will have to place their orders online. The 32GB iPhone 5 will demand a $200 down payment, and those same 24 months of $20 installments. That’s $680 total, compared to Apple’s $750, for another savings of $70.

The deal isn’t quite as good for the 64GB version, which will sell for $300 upfront, plus those $20 payments. All told, that’s $780, but Apple only charges a $50 premium for the 64GB over the 32GB, not $100 like T-Mobile. As a result, you only save $20 compared to Apple.

Source: TmoNews

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!