Latest Nexus 5 “Press Render” Is Super-Fake

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We love leaks, and we love rumors, but while we can relish in the uncertainty that they provide, letting us pose all sort of what-ifs and dream about how we’d really like to see a particular model arrive, we’ve got to be on the watch for flat-out false information. Recently, a lot of Nexus 5 rumors have been flying about, and some of what they’re saying is just a bit hard to believe. While we weigh the potential veracity of some of the specs that have been rumored, the latest component to arrive, positioned as an “unofficial” press image, is clearly a flat-out fake meant to deceive us.

The image above and to the left was slipped to phoneArena by a tipster, claiming that it would arrive with a 5.2-inch 1080p display, Snapdragon 800, 16-megapixel camera, and 3GB of RAM – specs we’ve heard rumored before. The source also adds that the X in the Nexus logo on the phone would act as a notification light, glowing to get your attention. With the date on the image matching Google I/O, it has all the trappings of a press teaser.

Except, a cursory Google Image Search reveals that this is largely an image of the Hero H9500+ (above, right), edited with that Nexus logo and to add in that date – even the time remains unchanged. With a 5.3-inch screen on the H9500+, it was a good starting place for a fake 5.2-inch Nexus 5, but a little more care might have been taken to avoid discovery; we would suggest changing the wallpaper next time, but it’s not like we want fakes being harder to spot, so carry on!

Source: phoneArena, DracoTek

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!