Microsoft Eases Access to Flash on Windows Tablets

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With iOS maintaining its firm anti-Flash stance, and seeing Adobe back away from work on Flash for Android, it may have seemed like the book was closed on Flash’s mobile story. For all the problems it’s had finding a home on smartphones and tablets, Flash is still a huge part of how many of us access the internet. As such, it turns out that Flash still has a little bit of a fight left in it, and will be finding a more prominent home on Windows 8 based tablets.

So far with Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 8 and Windows RT, if you were surfing the web in tablet mode, you had to manually configure your browser to enable Flash on individual sites; despite a working Flash interpreter, Microsoft was concerned about performance and compatibility issues, so it was disabled by default.

Now, Microsoft has admitted that, by and large, Flash works pretty well on these platforms, and there’s no longer a need to keep it turned off by default. Instead, Microsoft will manage a “Compatibility View” list of those few sites known not to work well with this Flash implementation, and disable Flash in only those cases; the vast majority of Flash-using websites will have Flash enabled by default. Right now, Microsoft says that something like 4% of sites using Flash have compatibility issues.

Source: Microsoft
Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!