Using the Surface Pro to Control a DSLR Camera (Video)

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The two cameras built into the Surface Pro on the front and back are not professional quality at all. They’re only 720p resolution, so basically they’re only good for things like Skype video calls.  Still the Surface Pro is for professionals, so I’m going to use it to control a full-sized digital single lens reflex camera connected via USB.  In this video we’ll be using a Nikon D7000 with the Nikon Camera Control Pro 2 software installed on the tablet.  Most other professional DSLR camera brands are capable of connecting to similar software for remote camera control and image storage. For example, if you have a Canon EOS DSLR, there is the EOS Utility.  If you have a camera with a WiFi wireless adapter, you could use that to control the camera instead of a USB cable.

All you really have to do is install the proper software and then plug in the camera. Nikon Camera Control Pro gives you a dialog box with multiple tabs and menus for controlling just about every aspect of the camera’s settings.  You can also set it to load the full resolution RAW photos straight to the tablet’s solid state drive.  This comes in very handy for instant editing in Adobe Camera RAW, Photoshop, or any other image editor. Of course, you can also set the software to save photos directly to a network share or SkyDrive or any other cloud storage folder for quick sharing as well.

Overall, the Surface Pro is going to be an excellent companion for the professional photographer.

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About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002.Read more about Adam Lein!